Commodore Computers

Welcome to my Commodore collection.

This page is a repository for all of the Commodore systems, peripherals, and accessories in my collection – it’s currently a work-in-progress, and I’ll continue to add things as and when I have the time.

Commodore PET 3032

TypeHome computer
Release dateMarch 1979
DiscontinuedUnknown
Operating systemCommodore BASIC 4.0
CPUMOS 6502 @ 1 MHz
Memory32 KB

This CBM 3032 is a successor to the Commodore PET 2001 series, featuring a full-size mechanical keyboard and 32 KB RAM, but without an internal cassette deck. Although the keyboard is of a more conventional size than the original PET, it still retains the PET’s quirky arrangement, and lacks a CONTROL key.

Commodore 4040 5.25″ Dual-FDD

Type5.25″ Floppy Disk Drive
Release dateJuly 1979
DiscontinuedUnknown
Operating systemCBM DOS 2.6
CPUMOS 6502 & MOS 6504 @ 1 MHz
Memory4 KB

The Commodore 4040 5.25″ dual-FDD from Commodore Business Machines (CBM) was the replacement for the previous models 2040 (U.S.) and 3040 (Europe). It is compatible with single-sided, single-density (SS1D) 170 KB floppy disks, and uses the parallel IEEE-488 interface common to Commodore PET/CBM computers. And extra header byte gives it write incompatibility with the later Commodore 1540 and 1541.

Commodore VIC-20 (Early)

TypeHome computer
Release dateJuly 1981
DiscontinuedJanuary 1985
Operating systemCommodore BASIC 2.0
CPUMOS 6502 @ 1.108 MHz
Memory5 KB (32 KB max.)

The Commodore VIC-20 is home computer produced by CBM, which was aimed at the personal and hobby end of the market. It was the first microcomputer to sell one million units. The “breadbin” case design of the VIC-20 was later used in the Commodore C64, C64G, and C16. Early models had a keyboard very similar to the PET, a long mainboard, and a small mould resin square power supply with a two prong connector.

Commodore VIC-20 (Late)

TypeHome computer
Release dateJuly 1981
DiscontinuedJanuary 1985
Operating systemCommodore BASIC 2.0
CPUMOS 6502 @ 1.108 MHz
Memory5 KB (32 KB max.)

The Commodore VIC-20 is home computer produced by CBM, which was aimed at the personal and hobby end of the market. It was the first microcomputer to sell one million units. The “breadbin” case design of the VIC-20 was later used in the Commodore C64, C64G, and C16. Later models had a short mainboard, and used the same wedge-shaped power supply with a DIN connector as the Commodore 64.

Commodore VIC-1540 5.25″ FDD

Type5.25″ Floppy Disk Drive
Release dateJuly 1981
DiscontinuedDecember 1983
Operating systemCBM DOS 2.6
CPUMOS 6502 @ 1 MHz
Memory2 KB

The Commodore 1540 5.25″ FDD was intended for use with the VIC-20 – its hardware is functionally identical to the 1541, but due to a different ROM, it is not forward-compatible with the C64. It is uses single-sided, single-density (1SSD) 170 KB floppy disks, and uses the serial IEC interface common to all later Commodore 8-bit computers. The 1540 features similar styling to the VIC-20, with a cream case and black front badge.

Commodore VIC-1541 5.25″ FDD

Type5.25″ Floppy Disk Drive
Release dateSeptember 1981
DiscontinuedNovember 1982
Operating systemCBM DOS 2.6
CPUMOS 6502 @ 1 MHz
Memory2 KB

The Commodore 1541 5.25″ FDD was the successor to the VIC-1540, and was intended for use with the C64, but is also backwards compatible with the VIC-20. It is compatible with single-sided, single-density (1SSD) 170 KB floppy disks, and uses the serial IEC interface common to all later Commodore 8-bit computers. The earliest model, the VIC-1541, features similar styling to the VIC-20, with a cream case and black front badge.

Commodore C64 “Silver Label”

TypeHome computer
Release dateAugust 1982
DiscontinuedApril 1994
Operating systemCommodore BASIC 2.0
CPUMOS 6510 @ 0.985 MHz
Memory64 KB

The Commodore 64, or C64, is an 8-bit home computer from CBM. It is recorded as the highest-selling computer of all time, with between 12.5 and 17 million units. It featured an advanced video chip (VIC-II) and sound chip (SID), giving it superior visuals and audio compared to other systems of the time. Very early models featured a “buggy” mainboard (ASSY 326298) and plastic silver case labels.

Commodore C64 “Breadbin”

TypeHome computer
Release dateAugust 1982
DiscontinuedApril 1994
Operating systemCommodore BASIC 2.0
CPUMOS 6510 @ 0.985 MHz
Memory64 KB

The Commodore 64, or C64, is an 8-bit home computer from CBM. It is recorded as the highest-selling computer of all time, with between 12.5 and 17 million units. It featured an advanced video chip (VIC-II) and sound chip (SID), giving it superior visuals and audio compared to other systems of the time. Intermediate models featured a long mainboard (ASSY 250407 or 250425) and rainbow case labels.

Commodore C64 “Aldi”

TypeHome computer
Release dateAugust 1982
DiscontinuedApril 1994
Operating systemCommodore BASIC 2.0
CPUMOS 8500 @ 0.985 MHz
Memory64 KB

The Commodore 64 “Aldi” model was sold in Aldi stores in Germany, hence its name, for a limited period in summer 1987. The “Aldi” was released during the transition period between the original C64 and the C64C, and featured parts from both machines to use up existing stocks: a “breadbin” beige case, a C64C-style keyboard, and a C64C shortboard (ASSY 250469). All “Aldi” machines were manufactured in California, USA.

Commodore C64G

TypeHome computer
Release dateAugust 1982
DiscontinuedApril 1994
Operating systemCommodore BASIC 2.0
CPUMOS 8500 @ 0.985 MHz
Memory64 KB

The Commodore 64G was released during the transition period between the original C64 and the C64C, and was styled with features from both machines to encourage people to upgrade: a “breadbin”-style cream case, a “breadbin”-style rainbow badge with a cream background, a C64C-style keyboard, and a C64C shortboard (ASSY 250469). Most had a green power LED and white rubber case feet.

Commodore C64C (Early)

TypeHome computer
Release dateAugust 1982
DiscontinuedApril 1994
Operating systemCommodore BASIC 2.0
CPUMOS 6510 @ 0.985 MHz
Memory64 KB

The Commodore 64C was a cost-reduced, modernised version of the original Commodore 64, featuring the same functionality but with renewed hardware. It featured a cream wedge-style case and a grey front label; early machines had a cream keyboard with text on the front of the keys, and a late longboard (250466) that used two 41464 RAM ICs instead of eight 4164 RAM ICs as a basic cost-reduction measure.

Commodore C64C (Late)

TypeHome computer
Release dateAugust 1982
DiscontinuedApril 1994
Operating systemCommodore BASIC 2.0
CPUMOS 8500 @ 0.985 MHz
Memory64 KB

The Commodore 64C was a cost-reduced, modernised version of the original Commodore 64, featuring the same functionality but with consolidated hardware. It featured a cream wedge-style case and a grey front label; later machines had a cream keyboard with text on the top of the keys, and a shortboard (250469) which was completely redesigned, featuring newer, more efficient HMOS ICs with a reduced chip count.

Commodore SX-64 “Executive Computer”

TypeHome computer
Release dateAugust 1984
DiscontinuedApril 1986
Operating systemCommodore BASIC 2.0
CPUMOS 6510 @ 0.985 MHz
Memory64 KB

The Commodore SX-64, or “Executive Computer”, is a portable version of the Commodore 64 home computer, and the first ever full-colour portable computer. The SX-64 features a built-in 5″ CRT display and 1541 5.25″ FDD, as well as a detachable keyboard. It weighs 10.5 KG and is carried by a sturdy handle, which doubles as an adjustable stand. It is powered from a mains supply, but was originally designed to use a battery pack.

Commodore C128

TypeHome computer
Release dateApril 1985
DiscontinuedFebruary 1989
Operating systemCommodore BASIC 2.0 / 7.0, CP/M
CPUMOS 8502 @ 1-2 MHz,  Zilog Z80 @ 4 MHz
Memory128 KB

The Commodore 128, or C128, is the last 8-bit home computer that was commercially released by CBM, and is a significantly expanded version of its predecessor, the Commodore 64, with full compatibility. It featured two 64 KB banks of RAM, an 80-column colour video output, and a Zilog Z80 CPU which allows the C128 to run CP/M. It has a cream wedge-style case like the C64C, and a full-sized keyboard.

Commodore C128D (CR)

TypeHome computer
Release dateOctober 1985
DiscontinuedJuly 1988
Operating systemCommodore BASIC 2.0 / 7.0, CBM DOS 3.1, CP/M 2.2
CPUMOS 8502 @ 1-2 MHz,  Zilog Z80 @ 4 MHz
Memory128 KB

The Commodore 128D, or C128D, is a variant of the C128 with a desktop-style case, 64 KB VRAM, external keyboard, internal 1571 5.25″ FDD, and internal power supply. The original C128D featured a plastic case and was fitted with the standard mainboards from the C128 and 1571 – the later cost-reduced (CR) version featured a metal case, a switch-mode power supply, and a purpose-built singulated mainboard.

Commodore 1541 5.25″ FDD

Type5.25″ Floppy Disk Drive
Release dateJuly 1982
DiscontinuedNovember 1986
Operating systemCBM DOS 2.6
CPUMOS 6502 @ 1 MHz
Memory2 KB

The Commodore 1541 5.25″ FDD was the successor to the VIC-1540, and was intended for use with the C64, but is also backwards compatible with the VIC-20. It is compatible with single-sided, single-density (1SSD) 170 KB floppy disks, and uses the serial IEC interface common to all later Commodore 8-bit computers. The second model, the 1541, features similar styling to the C64, with a beige case and rainbow front badge.

Commodore 1541C 5.25″ FDD

Type5.25″ Floppy Disk Drive
Release dateJuly 1986
DiscontinuedNovember 1988
Operating systemCBM DOS 2.6
CPUMOS 6502 @ 1 MHz
Memory2 KB

The Commodore 1541 5.25″ FDD was the successor to the VIC-1540, and was intended for use with the C64, but is also backwards compatible with the VIC-20. It is compatible with single-sided, single-density (1SSD) 170 KB floppy disks, and uses the serial IEC interface common to all later Commodore 8-bit computers. The third model, the 1541C, features similar styling to the C128, with a cream case and grey front badge.

Commodore 1541-II 5.25″ FDD

Type5.25″ Floppy Disk Drive
Release dateJuly 1988
DiscontinuedNovember 1993
Operating systemCBM DOS 2.6
CPUMOS 6502 @ 1 MHz
Memory2 KB

The Commodore 1541-II 5.25″ FDD was a substantial redesign of the earlier 1541 series, featuring a cost-reduced mainboard, a Newtronics mechanism with a track 0 sensor, a significantly smaller case, device number switches, and an external power supply which helped alleviate the overheating problems of the earlier drives. It was styled similarly to the 1571 and the C128D, with a cream case and grey front badge.

Commodore 1570 5.25″ FDD

Type5.25″ Floppy Disk Drive
Release dateJuly 1985
DiscontinuedNovember 1986
Operating systemCBM DOS 3.0
CPUMOS 6502 @ 2 MHz
Memory2 KB

The Commodore 1570 5.25″ FDD was designed for use with the C128, and was a hybrid of the 1541 and the 1571. Like the 1541, it has only one head for reading/writing, but like the 1571 it supports C128 “burst-mode” and can read/write two disk formats (the usual GCR format from Commodore, and the MFM format used by CP/M software). The styling matches the C128, with a cream case and grey front badge.

Commodore 1571 5.25″ FDD

Type5.25″ Floppy Disk Drive
Release dateJuly 1985
DiscontinuedNovember 1993
Operating systemCBM DOS 3.0
CPUMOS 6502 @ 2 MHz
Memory2 KB

The Commodore 1571 5.25″ FDD was designed for use with the C128. It has two heads for reading/writing, it supports C128 “burst-mode”, and it can read/write two disk formats (the usual GCR format from Commodore, and the MFM format used by CP/M software). It also has a Newtronics mechanism with a track 0 sensor, and device number switches. It was styled similarly to the C128D, with a cream case and grey front badge.

Commodore 1581 3.5″ FDD

Type3.5″ Floppy Disk Drive
Release dateJuly 1987
DiscontinuedNovember 1990
Operating systemCBM DOS 10.0
CPUMOS 6502 @ 2 MHz
Memory8 KB

The Commodore 1581 3.5″ FDD was designed for use as high-capacity storage for the C64 and C128. It was compatible with double-sided, double-density (2SDD) 800 KB MFM floppy disks, and uses the serial IEC interface common to all later Commodore 8-bit computers. It was styled similarly to the 1541-II, with a cream case, grey front badge, device number switches, and an external power supply.

Commodore (264) C16

TypeHome computer
Release dateMay 1984
DiscontinuedAugust 1985
Operating systemCommodore BASIC 3.5
CPUMOS 7501 / 8501 @ 1.76 MHz
Memory16 KB

The Commodore C16 is one of CBM’s 264-series of home computers, and was intended to be a replacement for the entry-level VIC-20. The 264 series’ TED chip gives better graphics than the VIC used in the VIC-20, but lacks the sprite capability of the VIC-II and the advanced sound capabilities of the SID used in the C64. The C16 has a “breadbin”-style black case and grey keyboard, with a slightly different layout to the VIC-20/C64.

Commodore (264) C116

TypeHome computer
Release dateMay 1984
DiscontinuedAugust 1985
Operating systemCommodore BASIC 3.5
CPUMOS 7501 / 8501 @ 1.76 MHz
Memory16 KB

The Commodore C116 is one of CBM’s 264-series of home computers, and was a cost-reduced version of the C16. The 264 series’ TED chip gives better graphics than the VIC used in the VIC-20, but lacks the sprite capability of the VIC-II and the advanced sound capabilities of the SID used in the C64. The C116 has a miniaturised Plus/4-style black case and a grey rubber chiclet-style membrane keyboard.

Commodore (264) Plus/4

TypeHome computer
Release dateMay 1984
DiscontinuedAugust 1985
Operating systemCommodore BASIC 3.5
CPUMOS 7501 / 8501 @ 1.76 MHz
Memory64 KB

The Commodore Plus/4 is one of CBM’s 264-series of home computers, and was marketed at high-end business applications. Unlike the cheaper 264 machines, the C16 and C116, the Plus/4 features a user port and RS-232 serial interface, as well as basic productivity software (“Three-Plus-One”) built-in. The Plus/4 has a black wedge-style finned case similar to the C116, and features a light-grey mechanical keyboard.

Commodore 1551 5.25″ FDD

Type5.25″ Floppy Disk Drive
Release dateJuly 1984
DiscontinuedNovember 1986
Operating systemCBM DOS 2.7
CPUMOS 6510T @ 1 MHz
Memory2 KB

The Commodore 1551 5.25″ FDD was a variant of the 1541 which was only compatible with the Commodore 264 range of home computers. It is compatible with single-sided, single-density (1SSD) 170 KB floppy disks, and uses a parallel interface via the cartridge port which is significantly faster than the serial interface used by the 1541. It features similar styling to the 264 series, with a black case and rainbow front badge.

Commodore 1701 CRT Display

TypeComputer Display
Release dateJune 1983
DiscontinuedUnknown
Operating systemN/A
CPUN/A
MemoryN/A

The Commodore 1701 was a 14″ colour CRT display designed for use with the Commodore 8-bit line of computers (primarily, the VIC-20 and C64), and modelled after the design and beige colour of the Commodore 64. It supports both a composite A/V input (on the front of the case) and a separate luma/chroma input (on the rear). It was a popular monitor due to its good-quality picture, its durability, and its versatility.

Commodore 1084S-D2 CRT Display

TypeComputer Display
Release dateFebruary 1992
DiscontinuedUnknown
Operating systemN/A
CPUN/A
MemoryN/A

The Commodore 1084S (“S” for “stereo”) was a 14″ colour CRT display with two major revisions: “D1”, designed for use with the Commodore 8-bit line of computers (primarily, the C128), and the “D2”, designed for use with the Commodore Amiga line of computers (primarily, the A500+). It supports a composite A/V input, a separate luma/chroma input, and an RGBi (D1) or analogue RGB (D2) input.

Commodore 1520 Plotter

TypeStylus Printer
Release dateJune 1984
DiscontinuedUnknown
Operating systemN/A
CPUN/A
MemoryN/A

The Commodore 1520 was a mini plotter device, which could plot graphics and print text in four colours using tiny ballpoint pens. The 1520 was based upon the Alps Electric DPG1302, a mechanism which also formed the basis of numerous other inexpensive plotters for home computers of the time (i.e. the Atari 1020). It was modelled after the Commodore 64, with a beige case and rainbow front badge.

Commodore MPS 801 Printer

TypeDot-Matrix Printer
Release dateMarch 1984
DiscontinuedUnknown
Operating systemN/A
CPUN/A
MemoryN/A

The Commodore MPS-801 is a matrix (stylus) printer, which was one of the first printers offered by Commodore for its range of home computers. It used fan-fold paper via a paper tractor; its print resolution was a 6×7 matrix at 10 chars/inch, and its printing speed was 50 chars/second. It only supports unidirectional printing, which is very slow. It uses a serial IEEE-488 interface, the same as Commodore’s 8-bit line of computers.

Commodore MPS 803 Printer

TypeDot-Matrix Printer
Release dateUnknown
DiscontinuedUnknown
Operating systemN/A
CPUN/A
MemoryN/A

The Commodore MPS-803 is a matrix (stylus) printer, the successor to the MPS-801. It could use standard single sheets, or continuous paper using a tractor attachment; its print resolution was a 6×7 matrix at 10 chars/inch with a speed of 60 chars/second, and it supports bidirectional printing. It uses a serial IEEE-488 interface, the same as Commodore’s 8-bit line of computers. It came in two variants: C64 beige, and 264 black.

%d bloggers like this: